Habitat

Maldives

Winds of Euphoria

A study of element & color

Tranquil Fascination

The winds of euphoria are lullibyes for a soothing dream
Life in the Maldives is one of integration with nature and a feeling of awe for these enchanting isles that invoke a sense of “heaven on Earth.”

The South-West Asia country has an elevation of just 1.5 meters, making it the lowest in the world. The archipelago stretches across 90,000 square kilometers.

There are about 1200 islands in a chain of 26 atolls. From top to bottom, it’s 820 km from northern-most island to Addu atoll south of the equator.
It’s 130 km from east to west. Most of the islands are uninhabited, and some are not much more than slabs of coral and a pile of sand with a palm tree or two.
The Maldives have attracted the world’s most reknowned scientists to ponder upon its creation. In 1842, Charles Darwin presented his theory after studying coral atolls in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.
Darwin said that the coral reef grew along the edges of volcanos that rose from the ocean. After a volcano receded, the reefs remained circular, protecting a lagoon within.
Over time, these lagoons were filled in with dead coral and organic materials, and thus the islands born.
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Peaceful vibrations and vibrant colors are bound to put your mind and body to tranquil ease.
In more recent times, scientists discovered that fish have greatly assisted in the formation of the islands. Parrotfish eat coral polyps. The excrement of this stony coral has built entire fine-sand beaches.
The species and habitat of the Maldives exemplify astounding and beautiful biodiversity.
Mangroves create an entire ecosystem, and like other wetlands around the world, they are facing a high risk of erasure by development.
The diverse companion ecosystem, rightfully known as “rainforests of the sea,” is the shallow coral reefs.
Indeed, the majority of the Maldives is of water; hence, the majority of animal life is aquatic.

From the cetaceans (mammals) there are many types of dolphins and whales, to multitudes
of tropical fish, manta ray, shark, and turtle. It’s no wonder there’s never a dull moment on
the water.

The sky is home to many birds seen catching fish every day from the rocks or swooping across the ocean.
The Indian Flying Fox (Fruit Bat) don’t seem to know that they’re reputation is for being a creature of the night. They dart across blue skies and turquoise lagoons to hang upside down from the trees.
You’ll never see a place from the eyes of someone who has the knowledge of generations.
For every generation, there is a preceding generation that paved the way to this point. Work hard to contribute to the future.
Without the contributions of our ancestors, we would not have arrived by way of an already carved path today.
Stories have lain hidden for centuries scattered across the atolls. One could spend a lifetime exploring its corners, learning about the previous generations, and history of ancient explorers in these remote and hard to reach parts of Earth.
The Maldives was an important crossroads in the ancient spice route. Seafarers traversing the Indian Ocean stopped for supplies or due to shipwrecks sailing between Asia, Africa, and the Arab world.
The country’s culture and traditions revolve around the sea, and of course, fishing, the always abundant food source.
The stylish Dhoni is unique to the Maldives and their direct neighbors Sri Lanka and South India. The early boats had sails and were commonly built from the wood of coconut trees. Nowadays, most sails have been replaced with motors.

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Due to a small population and a unique, tight-knit community, the local Maldivian people have a mellow vibe with less pressure than most societies in the world.
They are very friendly. In some places, they have rarely seen foreigners, so it can help to break the ice by taking an initiative by saying hello!
The spoken and written language of the Maldives is Dhivehi. At the time of this writing and not expected anytime soon, Dhivehi is not in Google Translate.
It’s a hybrid comprised of the peoples who’ve influenced the archipelago, including English, Hindustani, Portuguese, Persian, French, and Arabic. The writing and characters of the alphabet have an Arabic influence.
There is a sense of pristine cleanliness in this island chain of pearls. It becomes evident that the people have a heightened sense of tidiness and organization seen in the daily activity of routine and maintenance.
The equatorial weather and elements in the Maldives are relatively mild-mannered compared to other latitudes. However, like anywhere else, it serves one well to be aware of the surroundings and environment.
A nice thing about arriving in the Maldives is that it’s convenient and hassle-free. You’ll step off your plane, pass through customs, and step directly onto a speedboat that takes you to your hotel or charter boat.
Stepping away from the hustle and bustle of the city island of Malé as well as the luxurious yet corporate high-end tresorts, one immediately feels the sensation of going back in time.
Simultaneously, the Maldives have all the modern amenities, cell towers, internet, and in fact, among the highest literacy rates internationally. A return to basics coexists with reaching for the stars.
Before 2008, tourists went only to the high-end exclusive resorts and did not visit the resident islands.
Today’s tourism industry has diversified. The general population has opened guest lodges and tour operations that accommodate varying budgets.
Every year wave riders and beach enthusiasts travel to the Maldives from around the world. It is rightly known as one of the best ocean sport wonderlands, and most desirable places to go.
There are only two main seasons. Iruvai, the north-east monsoon, translated from the local Dhivehi language means, “hot and dry.” It runs from mid-January to mid-April.
Hulhangu is the south-west monsoon, meaning, “hot and west,” and runs the other half of the year, from mid-April through to mid-December.
Don’t underestimate the sun while in the refreshing ocean, as water tends to magnify its strength. Hydration and plenty of drinking water is crucial to prevent heatstroke. Sunscreens will to wear off faster than usual.
**Watch out for falling coconuts. Be aware of where you stand!

The more we’re aware of our environment, the slower time goes by, allowing us to intuitively assimilate the Earth’s moments. Whether or not we are conscious of the subtle details, they still exist.

An Intense Calm Travel Photo Book

COLLECTOR'S EDITION on Book Baby

Hardcover w/Dust Jacket

Kindle & Paperback

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